2006/Imagescustomers/A9searchLogo45pweb.jpg

 

 

ˆ    

 

 

/Images03/LookRadiocartoonsUP108%20.gif

 

 

ˆ  

 

 

2006/Imagestviup/TVIMag36x100UpWeb.jpg  

 

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

top
ˆ

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

ˆ

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

top
ˆ

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

top
ˆ

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

ˆ

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

top
ˆ

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

top
ˆ

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

ˆ

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

top
ˆ

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

ˆ

 

 

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

top
ˆ

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

top
ˆ

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

  

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

top
ˆ

 

 

  

 

 

 

 

/ 107 - / Celebrity Scene - smart90.com/tvimagazine/2005/3905107GeorgeClooneyBio.htmt

2006/Images/back.gif

Celebrity Scene
2006/ImagesPersonOfTheWeek/00personoftheweek60pw.jpg

2006/kudoadstore/Imageskudoad/linkad10660x500.gifClick for PERSON OF THE WEEK Click for Movie LookRadio

Yes107 Info
See SOW Movie

(You MAY need the FREE QuickTime plug-in to view and hear s90tv)

MORE / RELATED NEWS
George Clooney - "Good Night, and Good Luck"
The World and Career of George Clooney

MORE / PHOTO IMAGES
Nick Clooney Runs For Congress

1. George Clooney, Bio

2. Lessons from home
3. Parlaying Movies - for $$$$$

4. Clooney / Tidbits
TVInews 107 The World and Career of George Clooney, from Kentucky to Hollywood "Good Night, and Good Luck" - MORE

2006/Imagespeople/GeorgeClooneyMontage665w.jpg

2006/Imageskudoad/linkad02logo.gif

 TODAY'S PUZZLE?

2006/ImagesPersonOfTheWeek/00coverofpow108w.jpg

This Weeks Cover

PERSON OF THE WEEK SEARCH

2006/Imagescustomers/A9searchLogo45pweb.jpg

Oceans 12

Mind

Stubblefield

TVI Magazine
Back Issues

HOLLYWOOD
BEAT

2006/Imagespeople/celebritiesLogo108web.jpg

Amazon

soulfind.com

LookRadio
RadioPlayMusic

••

 

Returnˆ To Top'

GEORGE CLOONEY BIOGRAPHY
39th Week of 2005 / As we have already expressed in our tvinews reports, Kentucky has come up with some ot the great actors, singers, inventors, politicians, whiskey, fried chicken and news anchors -- whose combined talents have become household words around the world.
Of course, one of the best actors to come out of Kentucky was George Clooney, and in all probability, Clooney is one of the best ideal marketing men the promotional business. There's no doubt about it, he commences his promotional activities, while his latest movie or movies are still in the work in progress stage.
When a film finished, but still in the pre-distribution stage, -- in very unique way, he always promoting a sideline project, that might help you gain an interest in understanding the plot, like buying a home in Italy, or a hotel in Las Vegas.
This time he's promoting his, "Good Night, and Good Luck". Clooney not only co-wrote, produced, and directed the film, but he plays the role of (Fred Friendly) -- the producer of the top rated CBS news show of the 50s, "See It Now". The film is about Edward R. Murrow's on-air confrontations with Sen. Joseph McCarthy about his tactics in getting guilty pleas.
Section 8, a company created by Steven Soderbergh and Clooney, in 1999, was the primary producer and the Todd Wagner and Mark Cuban's 2929 Entertainment organization, was contracted to provide the cost for production and distribution.
And like always, "Good Night, and Good Luck" has some great stories the came from the shoot, both in pre and post production phases. You can find find the quotes 02
In the past, Clooney had constantly booby-trapped his co-stars' rooms, often soaking Pitt with well-placed buckets of water (Remember Thelma And Louise? Well, take THAT you brilliant GIT!).
Then there was the gambling, and his most recent venture into Las Vegas, and the talk about buying a billion dollar hotel complex. As we said before, Clooney is a terrible gambler, horribly unlucky, but, on location in Las Vegas, he began playing blackjack, accompanied by Damon. Having lost 25 hands on the trot, he ran out of money and had to borrow $600 from his co-star, money that he lost near-instantly. The next morning, Damon found an envelope shoved under his hotel-room door. It was a cheque for $600 - prompt payment, very Clooney. But, looking closer, he saw that George had filled in the section on the cheque where you can say what the payment is for. If he tried to bank the cheque, the cashier would think he'd been lap-dancing for George. $600-worth! Again, very Clooney.
Of course, Clooney is well known for his way with the ladies, and he's had many high-profile relationships. After Talia Balsam, there were a couple of years, up until 1999, with Celine Balitran, a French model studying the law.
Then came Charlize Theron and Kimberly Russell, from whom George split when marriage and kids were mentioned ("He told me flat out it was never going to happen again"). And there was British model and TV presenter Lisa Snowdon, with whom George had an on-off thing, continuing through 2005.
In one of the Off periods, he saw Renee Zellweger. That he did not stay with her was proof positive of his inability to commit. There was also actress Krista Allen. Oh, and there WASN'T Julia Roberts, despite reports that Clooney had ruined her relationship with Benjamin Bratt.
After Ocean's Eleven (and a cameo in Spy Kids, directed by his old From Dusk Till Dawn buddy Robert Rodriguez) would come Welcome To Collinwood, a lower budget heist movie produced by Section 8, a company formed by Clooney and Steven Soderbergh, which was named after the military clause dealing with discharge on the grounds of insanity.
Here Luis Guzman would lead a shambolic gang in an attempt to bust into a pawn shop, Clooney playing a wheelchair-bound former safecracker who, for a small fee, teaches them how to pull off the job. It was a chaotic comedy and, quite literally, worlds away from his next project.
This was Solaris, a remake of Tarkovsky's haunting 1972 sci-fi classic. Once more directed by Soderbergh, this saw George as a psychiatrist who's called to a space-station circling the planet of the title when the astronauts begin sending back wholly disturbed messages. Solaris, it seems, in order to keep hold of any visitors, recreates people they loved and have lost.
Thus Clooney's dead wife, a suicide, turns up in bed beside him, alive once again. But now he must cope with the fact that she is a construct built from his memories of her. Is this real, is it right, is it what he wants? Delving deep into the nature of human relationships, the movie was contemplative, sad and very intelligent, drawing a subdued but genuinely moving performance from its star..
In George Clooney's, "Good Night, and Good Luck," -- Clooney not only co-wrote, produced, and directed the film, but he plays the role of (Fred Friendly) -- the producer of the top rated CBS news show of the 50s, "See It Now". The film is about Edward R. Murrow's on-air confrontations with Sen. Joseph McCarthy about his tactics in getting guilty pleas.
Section 8, a company created by Steven Soderbergh and Clooney, in 1999, was the primary producer and the Todd Wagner and Mark Cuban's 2929 Entertainment organization, was contracted to provide the cost for production and distribution.
Click To See More "Good Night, and Good Luck," Story

2. Lessons from home
3. Parlaying Movies - for $$$$$
4. Clooney / Tidbits

2. Lessons from home
"My father has lived 68 years in Kentucky and has very little to do with Hollywood," Clooney said. "And suddenly he's a Hollywood hippie."
When Clooney talks about his father, it's clear he feels the long shadow of the ex-anchorman. His father's ideals set the standard for his own. "There were plenty of times he'd say, 'Don't come back and look me in the eye unless you did this ...' " Clooney said. Even now, "He's the dominant one in the room. He's funny and smart. If he were here, he would be telling stories and we'd be sitting there listening."
"Good Night, and Good Luck" is "ultimately a love letter to my old man," Clooney said. "It's me saying, 'Thanks for setting the bar that high, for believing so strongly in the responsibility of information,' and taking it to the level where it cost him a lot of things over the years. There were jobs he left because he wasn't willing to compromise."
As a senior in high school and early days in college, Clooney wanted to follow in his father's footsteps, studying journalism for a bit and working briefly on a cable access channel. "I realized quickly I wasn't good enough to be able to play the game. I didn't finish college. I wasn't well-read. I spent a great many years trying to make up for my lack of curiosity in my early 20s," he said. "I had very little interest in anything. I was sort of floating by."
By his mid-20s, he had started to focus, partly as a result of watching his father grow frustrated and discouraged by the shift toward entertainment in television news. "They sent him to consultants for what color of suit to wear, how to part his hair. 'Don't write the news. Read the news.' All the things that were killing him...."
"I'd be watching some crappy news show and my dad would go, 'They're not talking about this or this. They didn't ask these questions.' It was a good education."
As for his own political agenda, he seems to have absorbed his father's liberal politics -- on issues including civil rights, gun control and equality for women. Earlier this year, he helped raise campaign funds for his father, who ultimately lost a Kentucky congressional race to GOP business consultant Geoff Davis.
But over time, he said, they grew apart politically, as his father drew closer to his Catholic faith. "Some of that wide angle of liberalism narrowed, and actually formed some friction between the two of us.
Both father and son knew the Hollywood connection could be a liability in the campaign. An inveterate letter writer who still uses an electric typewriter because he likes to feel the imprint of the keys on paper, George fired off a letter to the editor of the local paper complaining that Davis had unfairly linked his father with him. "I said my father had earned the right to be judged on his own merits, not mine.... If you have questions about where he stands, ask him. He'll tell you. But don't use me as a weapon against him." Click For More About Nick Clooney Runs For Congress
Recaping Clooney's statement, "in all things considered, it's been the worst year of my life." Besides his health problems, his grandmother and brother-in-law died, and his dog was killed by a rattlesnake, though Clooney tried to beat the snake off with a baseball bat. "The last thing the dog remembers is me hitting the dog," he told the LATimes. "It was really traumatic."
Without any commercial films, such as "Ocean's Twelve," he also lost more money than he had in a long time. That hasn't stopped him from forging ahead with a $3-billion Las Vegas casino development project with joint venture partners. In any case, if he needs quick cash, he said he can make a commercial or two abroad. In Italy, ads like the ones he's made for sunglasses, cars and Martini & Rossi, can bring upward of $500,000 each, he said.
Still, he and Soderbergh will close their company, Section 8 within a year, he said. "That was something we decided a long time ago. Steven and I looked at it as a great, fun experiment that will go sour at some point, and rather than let it go sour, we're going to let it have a good run.

03. • • Parlaying Movies - for $$$$$
In a way, Clooney has been able to carry on that independent spirit developed by those in the film industry, that is creating updated ways to produce socially and politically relevant films -- that have faded since the '60s and '70s.
As the story goes, a tan, talkative and friendly Clooney, while sitting inside his dimly lighted cottage on the Warner Bros. studio lot, in Burbank, explained the parlaying movie process this way to film and finance the 1954, Murrow vs McCarthy event.
"I'm in the enviable position of being able to force studios to make films that they wouldn't ordinarily make," he said. Besides citing "Good Night, and Good Luck," he mentioned his movie production, "Syriana," a political thriller set in the Persian Gulf, which he used to help persuaded Warner Bros. to co-produce, by agreeing to take no upfront dollars as the principal actor in the movie.
Clooney plays a career CIA operative, based on real-life agent Robert Baer, who uncovers a disturbing truth about his life's work. The Warner Bros. / Section 8 co-production, will have a Nov. 23 limited release. The general release date is set for Dec. 9.
While sitting behind the oversized wood and leather desk he shares with Soderbergh, Clooney with both feet on the desk, he continued the story on how he got the "Good Luck" deal.
"I had to go to Warner Bros. and say; . . . here's the deal! . . . say someone would pay me $20 million to be in the film . . . if someone were to pay me that (much), -- which I've certainly been offered, that would basically mean -- I'm a $20-million investor in this film; . . . it makes me gambling with them. I'm saying . . . I'm taking no money upfront . . . (because) -- I am already investing in this film! Now do you want to come on board? . . . or do I raise the money somewhere else, which I probably can."
It was in 1999, that Clooney formed a joint venture with partner Steven Soderbergh, called "Section 8". The Section 8 partnership enabled us, as producers of our own movies, to use profits from one commercial film, such as the "Ocean's Eleven" franchise -- to finance another less-commercial fare.
The Clooney/Soderbergh team parlayed their directing talents to produce the intriguing CIA / Chuck Barris TVhost based spy thriller, "Confessions of a Dangerous Mind," and "Good Luck". Clooney was the director on both films. Todd Wagner and Mark Cuban's 2929 Entertainment and Jeff Skoll's Participant Productions, were outside partners . "I got a dollar for writing the script," he said. "I had to endorse my check for directing and turn in my acting salary. Grant [co-writer, actor and producer Heslov] and I each made a buck for doing it."
The Luck of Kentucky
But Clooney said he wants to leverage his fame and power as a box office commodity while he still can. "I want to say I did it when it wasn't very easy. If it costs you a career, credibility and all those things, that means you did it on your own volition and you have to live with that. I'm okay with that. I'd rather be able to point back and say, 'At this exact moment in history when it was kind of tricky to do this, these are the stories I told.'"
And while it may be unrealistic to think a film might inspire young journalists to become Murrows or Friendlys, Clooney said, "The only thing you can do is raise that discussion again. What's been fun is to sit back and say, 'Tell me, what's so wrong about asking tough questions of all the government?'"
• • In "Good Night, and Good Luck",
the external enemy is communism, exploited by U.S. Senator, Joseph McCarthy, who is portrayed through archival film clips. In the 50s climate of fear, it was not unusual for journalists, actors, politicians, and producers to be caught into the stickey web created by McCarthy sympathizers, working in government.
In today's climate of terror and fear of stiff taxes, judicial activism, hurricanes and inflation; -- Journalists and Celebrity actor/producers, like Clooney, are caught between trade unions, studios, banks and government regulators. The fear of being accused or accusing each other of being traitors to their sponsors and/or to the higher-ups in their companies or political party, who demand them to back off controversy. "Murrow talks about 'a built-in allergy to stories that offend us,'" Clooney said. "The problem hasn't changed, really."
But it seems that after all is said and done in making so many films at Warner Bros., George plans to keep working with Soderbergh. "We're really good friends. We just were afraid of becoming administrators. All of a sudden we were businessmen. Not only are we not tremendously good at it, we really don't enjoy it. It's not fun."
"We feel like we're trying to pick the right spot to pull the plug and walk away."
And yet, the projects keep coming: "The Good German," a film directed by Soderbergh, stars Clooney as an American journalist who, while seeking his mistress in postwar Berlin, becomes entangled in a murder mystery; and "Michael Clayton," starring Clooney as a high-profile New York attorney in the last and worst days of his career. Both are scheduled for release next year.

MORE ABOUT THE MOVIE
"No one else could have gotten this film made," said Andy Friendly, Fred Friendly's son and a longtime television producer, executive and consultant. "He could easily sit at home and collect his $25-million paychecks for making big commercial movies, enjoy his home in Italy and hang out."
Many writers and students still ask for transcripts of Murrow's famous 1958 speech before the news directors' group, in which he observed television's power to teach, illuminate and inspire but added that "it can do so only to the extent that humans are determined to use it to those ends. Otherwise, it is merely wires and lights in a box."
The conflict between reporters' drive to cover important events without compromise and management's need to please shareholders and board members was spotlighted last year when CNN President Jonathan Klein asked anchors to show more personality. It came alive again this month when Moonves was described in a New York Times Magazine article as hoping to raise the entertainment quotient of his nightly news shows. He later qualified his remarks, saying he aims only for "change."
Movie studios too are under pressure to produce blockbuster crowd-pleasers, and in this climate, only someone with Clooney's clout and passion would be likely to make a politically engaged movie that aspires to also be entertaining, as "Good Night, and Good Luck" does.

03. • • Parlaying Movies - for $$$$$
In a way, Clooney has been able to carry on that independent spirit developed by those in the film industry, that is creating updated ways to produce socially and politically relevant films -- that have faded since the '60s and '70s.
As the story goes, a tan, talkative and friendly Clooney, while sitting inside his dimly lighted cottage on the Warner Bros. studio lot in Burbank, explained the parlaying movie process this way to film and finance the 1954, Murrow vs McCarthy event.
"I'm in the enviable position of being able to force studios to make films that they wouldn't ordinarily make," he said. Besides citing "Good Night, and Good Luck," he mentioned his movie production, "Syriana," a political thriller set in the Persian Gulf, which he used to help persuade Warner Bros. to co-produce, by agreeing to take no upfront dollars as the principal actor in the movie.
Clooney plays a career CIA operative, based on real-life agent Robert Baer, who uncovers a disturbing truth about his life's work. The Warner Bros. / Section 8 co-production, will have a Nov. 23 limited release. The general release date is set for Dec. 9.
While sitting behind the oversized wood and leather desk he shares with Soderbergh, Clooney with both feet on the desk, continued the story on how he got the "Good Luck" deal.
"I had to go to Warner Bros. and say; . . . here's the deal! . . . say someone would pay me $20 million to be in the film . . . if someone were to pay me that (much), -- which I've certainly been offered, that would basically mean -- I'm a $20-million investor in this film; . . . it makes me gambling with them. I'm saying . . . I'm taking no money upfront . . . (because) -- I am already investing in this film! Now do you want to come on board? . . . or do I raise the money somewhere else, which I probably can."
It was in 1999, that Clooney formed a joint venture with partner Steven Soderbergh, called "Section 8". The Section 8 partnership enabled us, as producers of our own movies, to use profits from one commercial film, such as the "Ocean's Eleven" franchise -- to finance another less-commercial fare.
The Clooney/Soderbergh team parlayed their directing talents to produce the intriguing CIA / Chuck Barris TVhost based spy thriller, "Confessions of a Dangerous Mind," and "Good Luck". Clooney was the director on both films. Todd Wagner and Mark Cuban's 2929 Entertainment and Jeff Skoll's Participant Productions, were outside partners. "I got a dollar for writing the script," he said. "I had to endorse my check for directing and turn in my acting salary. Grant [co-writer, actor and producer Heslov] and I each made a buck for doing it."
The Luck of Kentucky
But Clooney said he wants to leverage his fame and power as a box office commodity while he still can. "I want to say I did it when it wasn't very easy. If it costs you a career, credibility and all those things, that means you did it on your own volition and you have to live with that. I'm okay with that. I'd rather be able to point back and say, 'At this exact moment in history when it was kind of tricky to do this, these are the stories I told.' "
And while it may be unrealistic to think a film might inspire young journalists to become Murrows or Friendlys, Clooney said, "The only thing you can do is raise that discussion again. What's been fun is to sit back and say, 'Tell me, what's so wrong about asking tough questions of all the government?'"

MORE ABOUT THE MOVIE
"No one else could have gotten this film made," said Andy Friendly, Fred Friendly's son and a longtime television producer, executive and consultant. "He could easily sit at home and collect his $25-million paychecks for making big commercial movies, enjoy his home in Italy and hang out."
Many writers and students still ask for transcripts of Murrow's famous 1958 speech before the news directors' group, in which he observed television's power to teach, illuminate and inspire but added that "it can do so only to the extent that humans are determined to use it to those ends. Otherwise, it is merely wires and lights in a box."
The conflict between reporters' drive to cover important events without compromise and management's need to please shareholders and board members was spotlighted last year when CNN President Jonathan Klein asked anchors to show more personality. It came alive again this month when Moonves was described in a New York Times Magazine article as hoping to raise the entertainment quotient of his nightly news shows. He later qualified his remarks, saying he aims only for "change."
Movie studios too are under pressure to produce blockbuster crowd-pleasers, and in this climate, only someone with Clooney's clout and passion would be likely to make a politically engaged movie that aspires to be entertaining, as "Good Night, and Good Luck" does.

_________

4. ByLines: Tidbits
"Good Night, and Good Luck" started shooting after Clooney, who had gained 35 pounds for the role, was injured during some fight scenes. Mysterious and excruciating headaches turned out to have been the result of a spinal leak, which requires in-hospital treatment every two weeks.
"We'd already written the script, hired all the people. I knew there was no way I could not do it. It's one of those things that forces you to go," he said. "It's actually good for you. People think you should stay in bed and get well. Had I not had all this work to do, I would have sat around and felt sorry for myself."
At first, Clooney hoped to play Murrow. But after watching the old clips, he realized that Murrow had the look of someone who was carrying the weight of the world and hardly anyone would buy the easygoing Clooney in the role. He hired Strathairn instead. Frank Langella plays CBS boss William Paley; Robert Downey Jr. plays reporter Joe Wershba, with Patricia Clarkson as his wife, Shirley.
Clooney did not want to hire an actor to play McCarthy. "I wanted to deal with the movie the same way Murrow dealt with McCarthy, in his own words," he said. To blend the old black-and-white footage with new shots, the film was shot in color, which is less expensive, and transferred to black-and-white stock.
Clooney said he researched opposing points of view for "Good Night, and Good Luck," and ended up incorporating the opinions of people who thought Murrow was inappropriately using his news show to editorialize.
In one scene, Paley asks Murrow why he didn't correct McCarthy when he said Alger Hiss was a traitor, the implication being that Murrow didn't want to risk appearing to be defending Hiss. "Obviously Paley didn't say that," Clooney said. "I got that from one of the opposition. I wanted the arguments to be brought up."
One scene, taken from real life, has the editorial team meeting in a room, each one in turn revealing any potential past involvement with communism that could hurt the show later. "They knew they were risking everything to do this program.
They were young guys in their late 20s and 30s, with new homes, families, mortgages. They knew the future of the country was at stake, and they knew they were targets. The government tried to intimidate them. Even Eisenhower, a courageous general, pretty much stayed silent on this topic of McCarthy."
But in lionizing Murrow, it's easy, of course, to forget what ultimately happened to him: Ironically, despite the overwhelmingly positive response from critics and the public, the McCarthy programs eventually led to the demise of "See it Now" and, for a time, squelched the airing of controversial documentaries on CBS, Friendly said. In the end, the constant static from advertisers and affiliates gave Paley, in his words in the film, "a constant stomachache." "See It Now" was moved from its weekly slot to Sunday afternoons, and two years later, it was off the air.
"Murrow left 10 years later, frustrated and depressed. My father left after that, after being president of CBS News," Friendly said. "He resigned in protest after CBS refused to run Senate hearings on Vietnam in favor of the third rerun of 'I Love Lucy,' " he said.
The feature was shot in color, but was intentionally converted to black-and-white to keep the 50s TV documentary style, created by Edward R. Murrow.
• • More About Exposing Journalists Ethics and the Movie
In the 1950s, the external enemy was communism and fear of being overtaken by Russia. The two subjects were exploited not only by Sen. McCarthy, but also Rosemary Clooney, Bing Crosby and Frank Sinatra. The sound of music in a good movie, like, "White Christmas", helped overcome the fear of war.
Clooney said recently about the $8-million cost to film "Good Night, and Good Luck", that the film has hit possibilities at a moment because its main point is about, "what is true, and what isn't, and how are you going to say it." "Journalists, he says, need couragement to combat both government officials who try to intimidate them, and corporate bosses who want them to entertain viewers -- by sparking themselves into real life." Broadcasters have been praised for holding government officials' feet to the fire after Hurricane Katrina.
"There are very few guys who are out-and-out heroes to writers," Clooney said. "In broadcast, the two most famous were Murrow taking on McCarthy and Cronkite taking on Vietnam. They had a direct and immediate impact on our country. I believe it's the responsibility of journalism to ask questions, and especially broadcast journalists since 90% of our news now comes from them."
• • In the film, the external enemy is communism, exploited by McCarthy, who is portrayed through archival film clips. In a climate of fear, journalists and producers are caught between McCarthy sympathizers in government, who can accuse them of being traitors, and their sponsors and higher-ups in their companies, who want them to back off controversy. "Murrow talks about 'a built-in allergy to stories that offend us,' " Clooney said. "The problem hasn't changed, really."

Mike Clooney's personal views through his columns:
• The environment: "All those conservationists and environmentalists and tree huggers were right. The regulations they have called for and nagged about for a couple of generations are working. Our countryside is coming back to life." -- Jan. 9, 1995. Click for More About Nick Clooney Runs For Congress

More Articles • Converging News 392005 / TeleCom Buy Outs, Spinoffs and Asset Seizure Boom

Respectfully Submitted
Josie Cory
Publisher/Editor TVI Magazine
 TVI Magazine, tviNews.net, YES90, Your Easy Searh, Associated Press, Reuters, BBC, LA Times, NY Times, VRA's D-Diaries, Industry Press Releases, They Said It and SmartSearch were used in compiling and ascertaining this Yes90 news report.
 ©1956-2006. Copyright. All rights reserved by: TVI Publications, VRA TelePlay Pictures, xingtv and Big Six Media Entertainments. Tel/Fax: 323 462.1099.

We Preserve The Moment

Return ˆ To Top

BUY AMAZON

Click

for tviNews PERSON OF THE WEEK

Search

for

Return ˆ To Top


We Preserve The Moment
Yes90 tviNews S90
TVInews 107 The World and Career of George Clooney, from Kentucky to Hollywood "Good Night, and Good Luck" / Photo Image665 Montage Television International Magazine's Person Of The Week POW 392005 - / NEWS Convergence - 39th Week of 2005 / Feature Story • 107GeorgeClooneyBio.htm Smart90, s90tv, lookradio, wifi90, tvimagazine, dv90, vratv, xingtv, Ddiaries, nbs100, Look Radio, Troy Cory-Stubblefield, Josie Cory, Television With No Borders

Legal Notices Copyright Information
How Do We Do Business?
Tel 323 462-1099
SEND E-MAIL
Return ˆ To Top

Explorer

45+110+565=720 /